HEADS UP

HEADS UP

Easily understanding the neck

Being able to draw the neck muscles accurately can instantly make a portrait look much more professional and complete. It is so easy to understand how to draw the neck properly that is literally a shame trying to “guess”. All you need is two points and five lines connecting them…simple as that.

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STRENGTH YOU DIDN’T KNOW YOU HAD

STRENGTH YOU DIDN’T KNOW YOU HAD

Exploring the muscles of the head

Reading this article is possible because someone is working hard for you at the moment, without you even noticing. Your head muscles not only support your head but also allow you to turn around or even eat your delicious sandwich. It comes as no surprise we have numerous facial muscles to help us with all these facial expressions, however the head muscles are equally important for anatomic reasons as well from an artistic perspective. Today we will have a quick look at these hard working parts of our body and see how they affect our portraits and figures.

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THIS WILL MAKE YOU SMILE

THIS WILL MAKE YOU SMILE

An introduction to facial muscles

Looking natural is fundamental for any portrait that wants to be called “realistic”. To be able to achieve this, showing the skin creases or stretches is necessary. The best way to learn how to draw them accurately is by having at least a broad understanding of the structure of facial muscles. Since we are not aiming for “medical level” studies we will only quickly go through groups of facial muscles and follow a very simplistic method to draw and memorise them.

 

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SKULL IN A BOX

SKULL IN A BOX

How to draw a Skull in 3D

This article brings together knowledge from the last 2 tutorials dealing with the skull. However, we focus on the volume and perspective rather than details of sketching the face or the side of the skull (we dealt with those in detail here: IT’S ALL IN YOUR HEAD and THE BRIGHT SIDE). This is the last one of the “Skull” series and attempts to create a very simple and quick method of sketching the skull in 3 dimensions. While the previous articles helped you memorise the proportions of the skull and its various components, here we will see how all these things connect to each other and work together to form the skull.

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TRY A DIFFERENT ANGLE

Try a different angle

Simple shapes in perspective

Date: 18/07/2018

Author: CHROMA

Time: 1.5h

Why would you read this article?

If you wish you could draw realistically then the first step you should make is learn the basics of perspective. Start with very simple shapes – a cube and a cylinder are a good starting point. Perspective, when broken down to simple steps is genuinely very easy. This tutorial will show you how to draw your first simple shapes; then it’s up to you to practice and experiment with more complicated objects.

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THE BRIGHT SIDE

THE BRIGHT SIDE

The Skull – Side

It is very cool being able to draw the front part of the skull; we used to do that since we were in school. If you want to understand though the volume of the skull, the structure of the bones and mainly how all these affect the proportions and arrangement of the facial features, then you really need to be looking at the side of the skull too. It is important to know what the proportions are and this is exactly what we are going to study today. As always, this drawing might not be 100% accurate, but it will definitely be a good starting point for you to understand and expand your knowledge in the long run.

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IT’S ALL IN YOUR HEAD

Human Anatomy

The Skull – Front

You are so into starting painting portraits but after trying a couple of times…things didn’t quite work. Yes, I know…I ve been there myself. Here you will find just the right amount of information to get you started – simplified, and easy to follow.

Why you should read this article

If you want to make some progress you need to follow a method; and trust me, there is no better tactic than understanding what lies underneath. Having a good grasp of the skull will help you gradually build your skill drawing and painting portraits.  In this article we will look at the structure of the front side of the skull (next article will be about the side view).

Continue reading “IT’S ALL IN YOUR HEAD”

STUCK IN THE CAGE

Human Anatomy

The Ribcage

In this article we will see step by step how to draw the front part of the rib cage. I only tried this myself a few days ago so I am sure it will be very helpful for absolute beginners. I will try to keep the article short and easy as usual.

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HORIZON – THE BIG HOOVER

HORIZON – THE BIG HOOVER

Where all lines get lost…


Previous article:  WHAT ARE YOU LOOKING AT…?


Right, in the previous article we made it clear that the horizon is directly connected to your eyes level. That means the higher you stand you will be able to see things from above and vice versa; you will be able to see things from below when you stand lower. How does this affect your drawings though?

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The lines tend to vanish as they go closer to the horizon. You can imagine the horizon as a big linear hoover that sucks the lines of your drawings. EVERYTHING has to vanish into your horizon. And this applies even to the objects that are very close to yourself. Even these gradually vanish in to the horizon. Lines can be interrupted before they actually reach the horizon ie. the small carton box standing in front of you doesn’t need to reach your horizon line to vanish, however the extension of its lines will do reach.

 

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Of course “vanishing into the horizon” is quite a vague phrase and everyone can interpret in various different ways. In reality perspective follows specific rules and the easiest way to understand it is by using the “vanishing points”. The vanishing points attract all lines of the drawing – this is where your lines actually vanish. A drawing can have 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 vanishing points. Working with 2 vanishing points is a good start for a beginner and once you master this you can easily start using 3 points.

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Now lets grab some paper, a pencil and a rubber and start drawing in perspective. Move to the next article:


Previous Article: WHAT ARE YOU LOOKING AT…?

Next Article: Coming Soon…


THE ARTIST…

28407451_1162363890564038_455176961_o“The article above as well as the whole series of the Sketching Advice articles is an effort to put together my knowledge and offer it to fellow artists in their first steps in as simple words as possible . I am not a professional artist or tutor, however I have spent some time sketching and through trial and error I realised that following some basic principles can simplify sketching a lot. Feel free to ask any questions and I ll be glad to help if I can .”

Love Sketching & Painting

CHROMA

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